Ferrari CEO Welcomes ICE Ban, Embraces Electric Vehicles

Ferrari CEO Welcomes ICE Ban, Embraces Electric Vehicles

08/03/2021

You’d think that an automaker famous for its V8 and V12 engines would have reason to be worried.

The roaring V8 or V12 engine is a big part of what makes a Ferrari what it is and it has been this way ever since the company was founded. The thundering growl of its ICE power plants is to this day one of the most important parts of the Ferrari experience, but the manufacturer will be forced to move to EVs.

With the ban on the sale of gas cars being announced by more and more countries and expected to be enforced come 2035, Ferrari, like all other car manufacturers, will have to adopt completely electric powertrains, and this will change its cars quite dramatically. However, the company’s acting chairman, John Elkann (who will be replaced by Benedetto Vigna on September 1), says he is not fazed by the looming change and, in fact, he says he embraces the inevitable electric future.

According to this article published on Reuters, Elkann announced that

We see the regulation as welcome. The opportunity set by electrification, electronics and other technologies that are coming available will allow us to make even more distinct and unique products.

The manufacturer also recently announced that sales had recovered from the low point they reached in 2020. Ferrari posted second quarter earnings of €386-million / $458-million, exceeding analysts’ expectations, but so far it has not announced what its plan to electrify is in detail.

One previous announcement was Ferrari expected to launch its first fully-electric vehicle in 2025. There have so far also been four electrified vehicles to bear the Prancing Horse badge: the LaFerrari, the SF90 and SF90 Spider and the most recent being the 296 GTB.

Of the four, only the LaFerrari didn’t come with a way to be plugged in. The SF90 and 296 GTB are plug-in hybrids, with the latter featuring a 7.45 kWh battery pack that gives it a claimed all-electric range of 25 km / 15.5 miles on the WLTP test cycle.

Source:Reuters

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