How driving a bigger car has made me a more responsible driver

How driving a bigger car has made me a more responsible driver

05/22/2022

I have realised how difficult it is for the driver to adjust his steering feedback in various tricky situations.

BHPian TSEA recently shared this with other enthusiasts.

This post is more on how driving a bigger vehicle has made me a more responsible (if not good) driver. Most of the points apply to all sizes as well as types of vehicles:

  • I have learnt not to try and squeeze in (a two-wheeler) from the left side of a vehicle which is turning left. While this was always in my mind, I occasionally used to try and squeeze my two-wheeler from the left of a vehicle turning left. It was dangerous and stupid. While driving a bigger vehicle, I have realised how difficult it is for the driver to adjust his steering feedback for such situations.
  • I have learnt not to try and overtake (even in a smaller car) a vehicle which is turning right, from its right side. This is again very dangerous and lands the driver onto incoming traffic (on an undivided road). While driving a bigger vehicle, I have been in situations wherein a spirited car/bike just landed on my right side, banging into upcoming traffic. In short, don’t overtake a turning vehicle.
  • I have learnt to be mindful of puddles and slow down (or even stop) even though it might not be required. This I should do to ensure I don’t splash a smaller vehicle (many times a two-wheeler).
  • Do not try to unnecessarily overtake a slow-moving vehicle in city traffic. 9 out of 10 times, I have met the same vehicle (which I just overtook) at the next traffic light.
  • Do not intimidate smaller vehicles which I might perceive are at fault (e.g. – Forcing incoming traffic to stay in their lane on an undivided road). Be more courteous and try to give way.
  • Be patient with other drivers (parents, spouse, friends, colleagues, cab drivers etc.) who are getting late to reach your place. There is no point in venting out on drivers who are late or putting them in a situation wherein they try to cover ground faster than they safely should.
  • Try to put the lights off (especially the LED Projector Headlights) momentarily for incoming two-wheelers, when driving on very dark roads. The projectors on SUVs tend to blind a two-wheeler (due to the scratches on the helmet visor).

Check out BHPian comments for more insights and information.

Source: Read Full Article